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Brake Fluid Leak Problems of Ford Taurus

Ford Taurus owners have reported 9 problems related to brake fluid leak (under the service brakes category).

car image   Brake Fluid Leak problem of the 2006 Ford Taurus 1
Failure Date: 09/01/2013

Without warning, there was extremely difficulty in stopping the vehicle. Fortunately, we were able to limp home where, suspecting a caliper or wheel cylinder leak, none was found. On closer inspection, an extreme leak of brake fluid was observed coming from the metal brake lines leading to the rear brakes. These lines were found to be extremely corroded. It should be noted that in my 50 plus years of working on cars I have never, ever seen such damage to such a key component for a vehicle.

See all problems of the 2006 Ford Taurus.

car image   Brake Fluid Leak problem of the 2001 Ford Taurus 2
Failure Date: 10/24/2012

I lost braking when a came to a hard stop. Noticed that brake fluid dripping out by driver's door. I found out the brake lines that go to the rear of the car ruptured. Most of the brake lines are visible and are in good shape under the vehicle. Part of the brake lines rise under a recess in the underbody floor. There a plastic shield protects it from the parking brake cable. It was there that the lines had corroded badly and ruptured. This is listed on sited on the internet and should be warned to all Taurus owners.

See all problems of the 2001 Ford Taurus.

car image   Brake Fluid Leak problem of the 2003 Ford Taurus 3
Failure Date: 09/29/2012

Calipers front right f reb caliper remove and inspect and overhaul caliper front one side. Brakes were grinding again which required that inspection which I find out that the same area in the brake system needs replaced. Recomd, tie rod inner remove and replace tie rod end one side inner, ball joints lower front left remove and replace f ball joint one side, 2 brake hoses front. Brake rotors front both needed replaced. Suggested tires due to mileage also rubber valve stem. System failure- required. Recd, brake fluid exchange with abs, and bleed brakes. Ceramic disc brake pads pd598 both front. 03/02/2013 mil 151213. 3rd repair shop, replaced all four tires with warranty brakes and pads along with discs needed replaced for the 4th time. Transmission flush due to leaking fluid. Qt dex 3 proline. Brake drums and shoes replaced. Replaced brake fluid, tie rod end one side inner along with replace of the shaft seal remove and install f axle shaft assembly one side. Tran's seal cr. Cv axle replacement. Ball joint replacement along with wheel cylinder rear both, brake service with rear brake drum. Engine light off/ runs poor diagnostic, replacement of pcv valve assembly, replaced upper and lower intake manifold gasket remove and replaced pcv valve along with tune up package. Relearn engine idle, rear brakes basic pc pkg, dorman rear right wheel and left cylinders. During these 3-4 repair shops cannot fix the cruise control to get the car to stop driving it self when above 30mph along with acceleration, back tail light right side shorts out continually. It is very difficult and very unsafe to control a vehicle that has had more than three or four repair shops try their hardest to fix a problem that apparently has some of these problems. I am with the belief that the brake system along the electrical system within the 2003 Ford Taurus ses dohc is unsafe for street use in the u. S. Due to our standards here of motor safety. When put into gear the transmission jumps loud.

See all problems of the 2003 Ford Taurus.

car image   Brake Fluid Leak problem of the 1999 Ford Taurus 4
Failure Date: 12/03/2009

While driving in a small town I experienced a loss in braking. The brake pedal went completely to the floor. I was able to guide the car to the side of the road, and then had it transported to a garage. They found that the master cylinder had failed. And was leaking fluid. This caused failure of the front brakes. On further inspection of the braking system they found that their was a leak in the brake line leading to the rear brakes. This leak was caused by external corrosion of the line. I thought that these lines were stainless steel, and should not have corroded due to salt on the roadway. If the lines are not made of stainless steel, they should be. The failure of the master cylinder and the leak in the line could have resulted in a serious accident, but did not because I was driving at a slow speed. I lost the complete stopping power of the car.

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car image   Brake Fluid Leak problem of the 1997 Ford Taurus 5
Failure Date: 11/28/2009

1997 Ford Taurus (1996-2005+) brake line failure. The brake lines to the rear of the car have a corrosion problem under the drivers seat, under the car. The lines corrode severely and then burst under pressure. All braking is lost after the fluid leaks out. Steel lines were not protected from moisture and have plastic shield that traps water.

See all problems of the 1997 Ford Taurus.

car image   Brake Fluid Leak problem of the 2001 Ford Taurus 6
Failure Date: 10/25/2009

2001 Ford Taurus, lost brake pressure while driving (pedal to floor). After further investigation I found the steel brake lines running to the rear of the car on the driver's side were completely rusted through, and leaking brake fluid at a very fast / high rate. It was obvious that the corrosion was cause by (2) plastic guards used to protect the lines from the parking brake cable. The guards held water, salt etc. . .

car image   Brake Fluid Leak problem of the 1999 Ford Taurus 7
Failure Date: 04/16/2009

While driving my 1999 Ford Taurus to work on April 16th of this year, I noticed what appeared to be light colored smoke coming off my tailpipe as I sat at a stoplight. At the next stoplight, the smoke was more intense. At the same time, I noticed my brakes seemed spongy. When I got to work, I checked the underside of the car and discovered brake fluid was pouring over the exhaust pipe, just before the muffler and was burning off. Upon inspection of the vehicle at a local Ford dealer, it was discovered that the brake lines leading back to the drums in the rear were severely corroded just in front of the left rear tire. One line had burst open and the second had a crack in it. This occurred simultaneously. Both systems were compromised at the same time. Had I continued to drive it, I would have lost all brake fluid and been left with no braking capability whatsoever. Further examination revealed similar corrosion just below the master cylinder near the left front wheel, although that had not been breached. The car is only 10 years old and had 65,000 miles on the odometer. It was regularly maintained exclusively at the Ford dealer (westfield Ford in countryside illinois). I traded the car in on a new model that day. After checking the internet, I became aware of numerous people with the same exact complaint. Although I no longer own the car, I am concerned this problem will surface with the thousands of Taurus vehicle currently on the road. If my wife had been driving the car with our two children in it, she would have never noticed what was happening until it was too late. This is a disaster waiting to happen. I contacted Ford customer care on 4/20/09 and met complete indifference. I was told my complaint would go on file and to have a nice day. If these brake lines were made with some type of defective steel and there are more models out there like mine, it is only a matter of time before they start rupturing and causing accidents with injuries or death occurring.

car image   Brake Fluid Leak problem of the 1997 Ford Taurus 8
Failure Date: 02/07/2009

While driving for a fuel fill-up on a heavily-traveled allegheny CO (PA) four-lane road (speed approx. 30-35 mph), traffic heavy, I experienced, without prior warning, a sudden total loss of all braking effectiveness. I followed a Ford f-250 pickup into the gas station lot and brought my car (1997 Ford Taurus sdn, 90,000 miles on odometer) to a stop by smashing into the back of the truck. No one was injured. There was extensive damage to the front end of my car; inconsequential damage to the heavy-duty steel rear bumper of the truck. A sizable puddle of brake fluid was observed forming under driver's side fr door of my car, caused by sudden catastrophic rupture of one or more hydraulic brake lines on my car, resulting in total loss of all braking power. My car is now under repair to replace all rusted-out or corrosion-compromised brake system components. What if, instead of 5:15 pm on a Saturday, this catastrophic loss of brakes had occurred at 3:15 pm on a school day, with a school bus in front of me disgorging half a bus load of school kids crossing the street in front of me? believe me, the flashing red lights of the school bus would not have caused my car to stop. In over 50 yrs of driving, this is the first time I ever experienced a brake line failure, and I routinely drive a car for 10+ yrs. Have the auto mfgrs been permitted to squeeze a few more pennies of profit by adopting a cheaper, less corrosion-resistant grade of steel for the vehicle brake lines? is not the braking system of my '97 supposed to have a redundancy feature to retain some braking effectiveness in the event of loss of one of the lines? the manager of the repair shop where I took the car tells me that brake line replacement has become an increasingly common repair in this part of the snow-and-salt winter driving belt.

car image   Brake Fluid Leak problem of the 1999 Ford Taurus 9
Failure Date: 05/29/2008

The contact owns a 1999 Ford Taurus. On may 29, 2008, the brake pedal extended to the floor when it was depressed. Brake fluid was leaking and burned the pavement in the contact's driveway. The vehicle was towed to an auto garage. The cause of the failure was determined to be brake line corrosion. The garage repaired the front and rear brake lines. The manufacturer is aware of the defect; however, they will not assist with the $285. 12 repair cost. The failure mileage was 31,529 and current mileage is 31,869. Updated 7/3/08 the corrosion was caused by water being trapped by a plastic guide that held the brake lines to the underside of the vehicle. Updated.