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Engine Cooling System Problems of Toyota Prius



Toyota Prius owners have reported 17 problems related to engine cooling system (under the engine and engine cooling category).

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2007 Toyota Prius 1
Failure Date: 06/02/2011

Toyota has failed to recall the electric water pump in the second generation Prius. Toyota has recalled the first generation Prius for a faulty electrical water pump, which is the same pump found in the second generation. While driving home from work, my check engine light turned on and I had to go to the Toyota service to get it checked. After being told that it was recalled on the first generation, I looked up information online on if this was the same water pump. I then came across numerous articles and recalls on other Toyota websites (in different countries) stating that the pump has been recalled. Toyota however has not recalled any of these cars in the USA.

See all problems of the 2007 Toyota Prius.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2005 Toyota Prius 2
Failure Date: 10/08/2010

2005 Toyota Prius stalled on an overpass with no shoulders. The transmission became stuck in park, and the vehicle could not be pushed since the front wheels were locked up. The car was eventually towed, and it had to be dragged onto the flatbed wrecker since the front wheels would not roll. The problem was determined to be a failed pump for cooling the inverter. The pump failed such that it blew a fuse that also controlled the transmission shifter, preventing the car from being put into neutral so that it could be pushed out of traffic lanes. This is a very unsafe failure mode.

See all problems of the 2005 Toyota Prius.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2005 Toyota Prius 3
Failure Date: 08/24/2010

2005 Prius stalling problem!! I never received any notification on this issue. As the article said"Toyota motor sales (tms), u. S. A. , inc. , will launch a special service campaign involving certain 2004 and early 2005 model year Prius sold in the u. S. On the involved vehicles, an issue with the program logic in the electronic control module (ecm) system may cause some or all of the following warning lights to illuminate: master, hybrid system, engine, vehicle stability control, and brake. If this occurs, the vehicle will enter a "fail-safe" mode which allows limited operation via the electric motor. However, the electrically-powered brake and steering operation will continue to function normally if this condition occurs. The electric motor will also provide enough power to allow the driver to pull the vehicle over and away from traffic. Once the vehicle is stopped, the driver may be able to restart the gasoline engine in the vehicle by pushing the start button. Toyota is proactively conducting a campaign in the interest of its customers. Toyota will inform owners of the involved vehicles with a special service campaign notification letter sent via first class mail beginning in late-October. Owners are requested to contact their local Toyota dealer for diagnosis and repair upon receiving their notification. Toyota will reprogram the ecm system at no charge to the owners of the vehicle. " NHTSA action number : pe05029 NHTSA recall campaign number : n/a component : engine and engine cooling engine and engine cooling:engine unknown or other my car have this same issue while I was on a freeway. I called Toyota dealership and was told that I would have to pays around $100 to get analysis. What can I do to get Toyota to correct this when they never sent me a notice for this problem. I bought this car brand new from Toyota around summer of 2005. [xxx] information redacted pursuant to the freedom of information act (foia), 5 u. S. C. 552(b)(6).

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2005 Toyota Prius 4
Failure Date: 08/20/2010

The contact owns a 2005 Toyota Prius. The contact stated that the inverter cooling water pump failed. While driving 72 mph with the vehicle speed control engaged, there were several warning lights illuminating causing the vehicle speed control to lose power. He drove onto the side of the road, turned the engine off and allowed the vehicle to cool down and it began to function normally. The contact was able to restart the vehicle and drive safely to his residence. The vehicle was taken to a local mechanic who diagnosed the failure as the water pump which listed error code p0a93. The vehicle was not repaired since the parts were on back order until September 16, 2010. He then contacted the dealer and manufacturer who also informed him that the parts were on critical back order until September 16, 2010. The failure mileage was 41,000.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2005 Toyota Prius 5
Failure Date: 08/10/2010

2005 Toyota Prius. Consumer states problem with vehicle overheating it was determined the water pump was defective and needed to replaced.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2007 Toyota Prius 6
Failure Date: 07/12/2010

2007 Prius (69k miles). Driving on highway, all caution lights came on. Towed to dealer and diagnosed with a 12-volt battery issue. $280 to replace the batter. Three weeks later, same cautions lights. Got most to clear with a restart with the exception of the "master caution" and the "engine check" lights. Dealer showed code of "p0a93" and stated inverter coolant pump needed to be replaced for another $486. Check online shows Toyota knows about the pre-2006 issues and that many 2007 and beyond owners are running into the same issue at various miles.


car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2005 Toyota Prius 7
Failure Date: 07/08/2010

I'm writing about an defective inverter cooling pump in my 2005 Toyota Prius. I was driving when all of a sudden my car loses the ability to accelerate. Numerous warning lights came on as I coasted to a stop in a nearby neighborhood. The car would not shut off at first. After I finally got the car to turn off, it would not turn on again. The display in the center of the dashboard would come on fine, but when it came time for the main engine to turn on (when pushing the start button), it would blink and shut off immediately. When I took a look under the hood, I could smell something electrical burning. I finally got the car towed to a local shop that was Toyota/Lexus certified. They figured out that the inverter cooling pump was defective and it was blowing fuses (hence the smell of something electrical burning). Total cost was almost $500 for the repair: parts and labor. I tried calling Toyota to see if I could get any type of reimbursement, but I got many reasons why I should not get one: - the warranty was for 60,000 or 8 years. I was in the 8 years, the mileage was 62,000. (I guess customer service does not mean much - previously I own a 94 Toyota corolla - 16 years with a Toyota car) - I did not get it repaired at a Toyota "dealership" (even though they were "Toyota" certified) - I did not buy the car new. (so if you buy a used Toyota, apparently that does not make the car a Toyota anymore. ) bottom line, after being fixed the car runs even better then before the inverter cooling pump failure: better gas mileage and no more phantom steering wheel movements when driving on the highway (happened when the engine would switch over to battery and vice versa).

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2004 Toyota Prius 8
Failure Date: 05/10/2010

Failure of inverter coolant pump occurred without warning during normal driving conditions. This is apparently a common problem occurring at many different mileage intervals for other owners. Immediate significant loss of power and several warning lights illuminated. Cruise control and a/c went offline. Requires replacement which in this instance was $605. 00.

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car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2004 Toyota Prius 9
Failure Date: 04/10/2010

Driving home at night on the 405 freeway at approx. 65mph, suddenly all the dash warning lights illuminated, including the mil symbol, along with a warning symbol on the navigation screen. I pulled off the freeway and parked at the curb. After checking the owners manual, I slowly drove the rest of the way home on surface streets. The next morning (Monday) I drove my car to miller Toyota in culver city. The primary diagnosis was failure of the inverter coolant pump, which was replaced under the terms of my Toyota platinum extended warranty. However, upon further research, I discovered that Toyota had issued a technical service bulletin (TSB) covering this very part, on January 26, 2007, indicating that they were aware of this failure-prone part, and that an "improved" replacement assembly was now available to address the issue. In addition, replacement would be covered under their 5-year/60,000 mile Toyota powertrain warranty. Approximately one month later, on may 15, 2010, while driving my father's 2004 Prius to have new tires installed, the same sequence of events occurred. I immediately drove the vehicle to the nearest dealer, santa monica Toyota, where it was diagnosed with the same failure code, p0a93 (inverter cooling system performance). Although the vehicle had only 34,242 miles on it, it was not covered under the powertrain warranty, as the time limit of 60 months had expired. No amount of discussion with the dealer or Toyota's customer experience center could convince them that this part should be considered part of the hybrid system, and as such be covered under their 7-year/100,000 hybrid warranty (despite it being named the hybrid inverter coolant pump). On-line Prius-related chat rooms are full of identical situations involving this part. Clearly, Toyota knows this part is prone to premature failure, but continues to treat it as a "secret warranty" item in order to avoid having to issue a formal recall.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2004 Toyota Prius 10
Failure Date: 01/23/2010

On 23 Jan 2010, while driving I-85n in the south carolina mountains the car stalled at 70mph. An audible alert sounded, the car jerked and three warning lights went off. I coasted the car to the shoulder and shut the car down. I restarted the car -- the warning lights cleared -- and continued driving. About 30 minutes later, still in the mountains, the same things occurred (stall while driving 70mph on the interstate. ) when I restarted the car a yellow "!" warning remained on. I continued the trip to virginia with no further problems. The warning light went out. On 5 Feb 2010, while driving on I-95s in the south carolina mountains the car stalled, warning lights and audible alarm sounded. Upon restart the "!" stayed on. This happened two more times; once on I-95 and once on I-20. The last two times the red triangle warning light stayed on also. On 6 Feb 2010, I took the car to Toyota center in columbia SC. The service manager told me the water pump needed to be replaced ($384) because air got into the system. I asked if that was why I could hear "sloshing" from the engine when driving; he said yes. I explained that I was confused since the coolant recovery tank never went below the low line. His response was that air in the system was a known problem for the Prius and that I should keep the coolant level higher than marked. Also that driving in the south carolina mountains -- both the heat of the engine and the angle of ascent and descent -- is probably what triggered the problem. Prior to both trips, the car was checked by a mechanic. Fluid levels were clear and adequate. I am now in the flatlands of texas, and I can once again hear the sloshing sound coming from my engine. Beyond the expense I am concerned that the engine is completely stalling. If this were to occur in rush hour in a crowded city I'm not sure the car would be safely navigable to the shoulder.


 
car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2010 Toyota Prius 11
Failure Date: 10/15/2009

My 2010 Toyota Prius does not always recognize the key and will not open doors and not start the vehicle. The gear shift jumps out of gear going from reverse to drive and vice versa. The heater does not work properly. I am afraid to drive my newly purchased vehicle. Please advise.

See all problems of the 2010 Toyota Prius.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2005 Toyota Prius 12
Failure Date: 07/20/2009

I am writing about an incident with my 2005 Toyota Prius. On July 20, 2009 as my wife was driving our Prius the engine light went on. She immediately drove into the parking lot of a small business and stopped the car. We had it towed to a repair shop. The mechanics there diagnosed the problem. The inverter pump that supplies coolant to all the engine parts had malfunctioned. The mechanics told us that the Toyota company was aware that this problem could occur on our 05 Prius. If we had the car towed to a Toyota dealer the defective inverter pump would be replaced with a more recent model free of charge. The next day we had the car towed to the dealership. They examined the car and verified that the problem was a defective inverter pump. Their codes as printed on their invoice number 524093 [21 July 2009] are "34352 pulled code poa93, sub code 346-inverter cooling system performance. Found TSB eg001-07 to correct this concern. Replaced inverter water pump as per stb. " this catastrophic malfunction occurred without any prior warning. We have maintained the car with regular maintenance as per the schedule in the owners manual. We were very lucky that the malfunction occurred while we were in town. Since we live in new mexico the malfunction could have occurred out in one of our deserts or on one of our mountains. We are both 73 years of age and both cancer survivors. The last thing that we needed was to be stranded somewhere or to have the engine completely destroyed if we were not able to immediately stop the car. I do hope that Toyota will be required to perform a recall on the Prius models that have this type if inverter pump so that owners can continue to drive their cars safely.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2004 Toyota Prius 13
Failure Date: 06/09/2009

This happened to me and cost over $700 to fix: failure of inverter/converter coolant pump. Hybrid vehicle has 2nd coolant loop for high voltage inverter/converter. Failure of inverter/converter coolant pump allows inverter coolant temperature to rise well above nominal. At a certain trigger point hybrid control ecu sets a trouble code that immediately disengages operation of inverter/converter (and simultaneously disengages cruise control and a/c, which runs of alternating current produced by inverter). Immediate impact is a sudden loss of vehicle drive power as inverter/converter supplies to electricity to motor generator 2 (mg2) which is directly connected to drive wheels and supplies needed motive force to maintain highway speeds (ice alone is insufficient). Also inverter/converter coolant loop provides cooling for mg2 & mg1. Continued operation of vehicle with failed inverter/converter coolant pump could result in catastrophic failure of main electric drive mg2 and subsequent loss of motive power. Pump failure occurs without warning, although there may be a brief period of intermittent pump operation/non-operation prior to final failure. The failure seems to be the result of either a defective inverter/converter pump ass'y or one insufficiently engineered to withstand continuous operation in such a critical component. Pump failure occurred after approximately 160,000 miles, although has been known to occur in other instances as early as 32,000 miles. Sudden loss of power and disengagement of cruise control at interstate highway speeds could cause driver to lose control or to be unable to safely steer to a safe breakdown lane.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2007 Toyota Prius 14
Failure Date: 05/01/2009

Coolant system has air in it. Service failed to diagnose the problem. Service campaign issued for other vins, but not mine.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2008 Toyota Prius 15
Failure Date: 10/17/2008

While my 2004 Toyota Prius was in the shop for its 30,000 mile maintenance, my mechanic found that the water pump has been leaking coolant (photos available). The car has only 21,600 miles, and its water pump should last at least three times as long. My local berkeley Toyota dealer had three 04 Prius pumps on hand which is indicative that many Prius are experiencing such a water pump failure. Im writing to inform you of what appears to be a substandard part on 2004 Prius.

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car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2004 Toyota Prius 16
Failure Date: 06/26/2006

Failure of inverter/converter coolant pump. Hybrid vehicle has 2nd coolant loop for high voltage inverter/converter. Failure of inverter/converter coolant pump allows inverter coolant temperature to rise well above nominal. At a certain trigger point hybrid control ecu sets a trouble code that immediately disengages operation of inverter/converter (and simultaneously disengages cruise control and a/c, which runs of alternating current produced by inverter). Immediate impact is a sudden loss of vehicle drive power as inverter/converter supplies to electricity to motor generator 2 (mg2) which is directly connected to drive wheels and supplies needed motive force to maintain highway speeds (ice alone is insufficient). Also inverter/converter coolant loop provides cooling for mg2 & mg1. Continued operation of vehicle with failed inverter/converter coolant pump could result in catastrophic failure of main electric drive mg2 and subsequent loss of motive power. Pump failure occurs without warning, although there may be a brief period of intermittent pump operation/non-operation prior to final failure. The failure seems to be the result of either a defective inverter/converter pump ass'y or one insufficiently engineered to withstand continuous operation in such a critical component. Pump failure occurred after approximately 160,000 miles, although has been known to occur in other instances as early as 32,000 miles. Sudden loss of power and disengagement of cruise control at interstate highway speeds could cause driver to lose control or to be unable to safely steer to a safe breakdown lane.

car image   Engine Cooling System problem of the 2005 Toyota Prius 17
Failure Date: 04/26/2005

1. I bought a new Prius in early March of 2005. I was coasting to stop (around 8-10 mph) for a yield sign and when I hit the foot on the brake, the vehicle started to accelerate. Funny, but this problem happens only occansionally! 2. Stimes the vehicles seems to come to a stall, at low speeds while making a turn or before coming to an dead stop. I personally have felt the vehicle going off the power during a turn, at low speeds <10 mph. 3. I tried to find any recalls on the vehicle, but was unsucessfull.


Other Common Engine And Engine Cooling related problems of Toyota Prius